Theseus and Amphitrite with Athena looking on

 

Theseus_Athena_Amphitrite_Louvre_G104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Euphronios, potter (signature); Onesimos, painter

Theseus and Amphitrite with Athena looking on. Interior from an Attic red-figure cup, 500–490 BC. From Cerveteri (ancient Caere), Latium.

Louvre Museum Department of Greek, Etruscan and Roman Antiquities, Sully, first floor, room 43, case 22

H. 9.6 cm (3 ¾ in.), Diam. 39.9 cm (15 ½ in.), W. 49 cm (19 ¼ in.)

Nereids

In Greek mythology, the Nereids (/ˈnɪəriɪdz/ neer-ee-idz; Greek: Νηρηΐδες, sg. Νηρηΐς) are sea nymphs (female spirits of sea waters), the 50 daughters of Nereus and Doris, sister to Nerites.

This list is correlated from four sources: Homer’s Iliad, Hesiod’s Theogony, the Bibliotheca, and Hyginus. Because of this the total number of names goes beyond fifty. [ wikipedia entry ]

Actaea (Ἀκταίη)
Agaue (Ἀγαυὴ)
Amatheia (Ἀμάθεια)
Amphinome (Ἀμφινόμη)
Amphithoe (Ἀμφιθόη)
Amphitrite (Ἀμφιτρίτη); the youngest Nereid and wife of Poseidon
Apseudes (Ἀψευδὴς)
Arethusa
Asia
Autonoe (Αὐτονόη)
Beroe
Callianassa (Καλλιάνασσα)
Callianeira (Καλλιάνειρα)
Ceto
Clio
Clymene (Κλυμένη)
Cranto
Creneis
Cydippe
Cymo (Κυμώ)
Cymatolege (Κυματολήγη)
Cymodoce (Κυμοδόκη)
Cymothoe (Κυμοθόη)
Deiopea
Dero
Dexamene (Δεξαμένη)
Dione
Doris (Δωρίς)
Doto (Δωτώ)
Drymo
Dynamene (Δυναμένη)
Eione (Ἠιόνη)
Ephyra
Erato (Ἐρατώ)
Euagore (Εὐαγόρη)
Euarne (Εὐάρνη)
Eucrante (Εὐκράντη)
Eudore (Εὐδώρη)
Eulimene (Εὐλιμένη)
Eumolpe
Eunice (Εὐνίκη)
Eupompe (Εὐπόμπη)
Eurydice
Galene (Γαλήνη)
Galatea (Γαλάτεια)
Glauce (Γλαύκη)
Glauconome (Γλαυκονόμη)
Halie (Ἁλίη)
Halimede (Ἁλιμήδη)
Hipponoe (Ἱππονόη)
Hippothoe (Ἱπποθόη)
Iaera (Ἴαιρα)
Ianassa (Ἰάνασσα)
Ianeira (Ἰάνειρά)
Ione
Iphianassa
Laomedeia (Λαομέδεια)
Leiagore (Ληαγόρη)
Leucothoe
Ligea
Limnoreia (Λιμνώρεια)
Lycorias
Lysianassa (Λυσιάνασσα)
Maera (Μαῖρα)
Melite (Μελίτη)
Menippe (Μενίππη)
Nausithoe
Nemertes (Νημερτής)
Neomeris
Nerea (Νηρεας)
Nesaea (Νησαίη)
Neso (Νησώ)
Opis
Oreithyia (Ὠρείθυια)
Panopea (Πανόπεια)
Panope (Πανόπη)
Pasithea (Πασιθέη)
Pherusa (Φέρουσά)
Phyllodoce
Plexaure
Ploto (Πλωτώ)
Polynome
Pontomedusa
Pontoporeia (Ποντοπόρεια)
Poulynoe (Πουλυνόη)
Pronoe (Προνόη)
Proto (Πρωτώ)
Protomedeia (Πρωτομέδεια)
Psamathe (Ψαμάθη)
Sao (Σαώ)
Speio (Σπειώ)
Thaleia (Θάλειά)
Themisto (Θεμιστώ)
Thetis (Θέτις); Leader of the Nereids
Thoe (Θόη)
Xantho

Thetis

900px-Dish_Thetis_Peleus_Louvre_CA2569

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Immortal Thetis with the mortal Peleus in the foreground, Boeotian black-figure dish, c. 500–475 BC – Louvre.

Thetis (/ˈθɛtɪs/; Greek: Θέτις [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the 50 Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus. [ wikipedia entry ]

grey eyed Athena

Fregio_della_gigantomachia_02

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winged Giant (usually identified as Alcyoneus), Athena, Gaia (rising from the ground), and Nike, detail of the Gigantomachy frieze, Pergamon Altar, Pergamon museum, Berlin

In poetry from Homer, an oral tradition of the 8th or 7th century BC, onward, Athena’s most common epithet is Glaukopis (γλαυκῶπις), which usually is translated as, bright-eyed or with gleaming eyes. The word is a combination of glaukos (γλαυκός, meaning gleaming, silvery, and later, bluish-green or gray) and ops (ὤψ, eye, or sometimes, face)    |   wikipedia entry

Ποσειδάων ‎(Poseidáōn)

Poseidon 1

 

Poseidon rushes to the defense of the Argives    |    The Iliad : Book 13    |    Battling for the Ships
Robert Fagles translation

Poseidon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poseidon, Apollo, and Artemis, marble relief, portion of the east section of the Parthenon frieze, 448–429 bce [ New Acropolis Museum, Athens ]